EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES ARCHIVES

Service Animal Awareness in Disaster Response

  Although they are companions to their human partners, service animals are not pets. Instead, they are trained to perform specific daily tasks, which are often still required when responders are assisting during a hurricane, mass casualty event, or another emergency. As such, emergency planning efforts should include service animals

Covenant School ‚Äď Reviewing Another Tragic Shooting

The Covenant School shooting is another reminder of active shooter trends. This article reviews the chain of events from that tragic event, post-incident reviews, and what communities are and should be doing to prepare for and prevent future active shooter incidents.

Biosafety Laboratory Issues and Failures

Concerns regarding unexpected biological incidents and their public health implications were discussed in a 2014 Domestic Preparedness biosecurity and bioterrorism article. From the improper possession and storage of decades-old live smallpox virus in a former Food and Drug Administration laboratory (lab) on the National Institute of Health (NIH) campus to

Guidance for Preparing Professionals Mentally for the Worst

  Professional groups have debated and researched the best practices relating to the standards and quality of care sufficient to maintain minimum standards during a disaster. Due to the fluid nature of a disaster, it is difficult to abide by a standard that will fit every situation. For example, the onset

Leader of the Pack ‚Äď Canine Detection

In the wake of a disaster, time is critical for locating survivors and recovering bodies. This type of work requires training, skills, and abilities acquired by canines due to their unique anatomy and physiology. However, there are key considerations before implementing K9 programs.

Linking Resilience and Innovation for Emergency Preparedness

Most industries suggest a certain level of resilience and innovation. It is important to get through challenging times to keep a company going, and ‚Äúinnovate or die‚ÄĚ has long been a mantra of the business world. While these concepts ‚Äď or in some cases,¬†buzzwords¬†‚Äď come up in various lines of

Winter Storm ‚Äď Reimagining Recovery Using Support Functions

Out of first-time events come many important lessons learned. For example, information must be disseminated using familiar terminology when an unfamiliar event occurs. In addition, recovery is a team effort that begins before the event has ended. Learn how the third most populated county in the United States handled recovery

Crisis Standards of Care ‚Äď A Mental Health Perspective

Crisis standards of care and sufficiency of care are topics of great controversy and debate in professional circles. The reasons may be obvious to most. Traditionally, health care responders are trained and held to the standard of care of their profession when rendering aid. Nothing less is acceptable. The public

Applications for a Newly Developed Risk and Resilience Tool

A new, publicly available tool provides a window into how future climate realities could affect U.S. cities and towns. Learn how planners and decision-makers can get map-based analyses driven by peer-reviewed climate data using this free portal.

Virtual Reality Training Revolution Is Here

The¬†click-through,¬†good-enough¬†training, ubiquitous in many organizations, is not good enough anymore. A¬†Harvard Business Review¬†article titled ‚ÄúWhere Companies Go Wrong with Learning and Development‚ÄĚ (L&D) discovered that only 12% of employees applied training from L&D programs to their work. The same article explains that hundreds of billions of dollars are spent annually

The Pony Express Rides Again

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, health care providers and facilities, local jurisdictions, and state agencies struggled to acquire personal protective equipment (PPE), such as masks, gloves, gowns, and hand sanitizers, for their patients and staff. Supplies of these items were extremely low and getting them shipped proved

How One Town Stood Up to a Category 4 Storm

When Category 4 Hurricane Ian crossed Florida in September 2022, more than 4 million Florida homes and businesses lost power. However, one town kept the lights on and was spared the devastation the cities surrounding it faced. With resilience and sustainability in mind, this author shares the planning involved in

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